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Matcha Soba Salad with Norimaki Mochi

Cold matcha (green tea) soba noodles tossed with fresh crunchy vegetables, a light and flavorful sesame dressing and topped off with a crisp and chewy norimaki mochi is the perfect way to greet spring.

Matcha Soba Salad and Baked Norimaki_IMG_4579

I made this little gem of a salad while foraging through my pantry on Good Friday looking for a meal that was to fill my belly as well as my soul.

When we lived in Japan, one of my favorite to celebrate the arrival of spring and summer was with homemade cold soba noodles with a mentsuyu dipping sauce and usually a side of sizzling hot tempura of vegetables and shrimp. There is nothing better on hot and steamy day in Asia.

Matcha Soba Salad and Baked Norimaki_IMG_8292

Trust me it gets hot in Asia! Japan is not the hottest place in Asia but after the tragic incident of the tsunami incident there is a rule to keep the air conditioners set at very high temperature. When you get lots of people crammed on the trains or in office buildings, it gets steamy hot. They even have relaxed their suits only dress codes to drop the tie and suit coats so that people are not dripping wet while at work. Then there is always someone who has to break the fashion code like this girl here.

Japanese Dress_IMG_0150

Hand fans to wave yourself with are big in Japan and even here in Hong Kong and all around Asia. Heck, I have one in each colour and I also am not afraid to admit that I hover under umbrellas to shelter myself from the sweltering heat while melting and waiting for the bus on the hot and steamy pavement.. After all of that, you crave something cool and refreshing. (Check out out the photo closely to the right. Do you see the "Do not Photo" sign? I was never one for silly rules... after all I still can't read the kanji only the katakana and hiragana so realistically it could say really anything...like don't bring your cameras inside the shop?... LOL)

Japanese Fans_IMG_0127

There are just some recipes that are magical and I just love the idea of the cool and refreshing soba noodles with the piping hot tempura. However, I am the gluten-free girl now and it is a good thing that soba noodles also known as buckwheat noodles are gluten-free. Of course, you need to double-check and read the back of the package to make sure that there are no added ingredients. As only the really good soba noodles are 100 percent buckwheat and some of the less expensive soba noodles are made with a combination of wheat and buckwheat flour. Oh and good luck with reading the kangi, katakana and hiragana on the back of the package...let me know how that goes for you..., and to all of my Japanese friends, you do not count!

Matcha Soba Salad and Baked Norimaki_IMG_8243

Soba (そば) means buckwheat in Japanese. Even though buckwheat has the word "wheat" in it is actually not wheat or even a grain at all. Buckwheat is derived from the seeds of a flowering plant. The triangular seeds also known as buckwheat groats, are made into flour  and can be used in make soba noodles. So this is all a very good thing if you are going gluten-free.

I had tons of salad fixings in my refrigerator and lots of fresh spinach and tri-colored peppers so I decided I wanted to make a colorful salad with my matcha soba.

Matcha Soba Salad and Baked Norimaki_IMG_8283

However, I did not have any dashi in the house to make a traditional dressing so I created this modified salad dressing that was super delicious. I mixed sesame oil, honey, tamari sauce, grated diakon and I needed something a little tart so I added a little tamarind juice and it was sublime.  Lemon, lime or yuzu juice would have been great in here as well but that was not in my fruit basket.

Matcha Soba Salad and Baked Norimaki_2_IMG_8260

As a healthier option instead of deep-fried tempura, I made norimaki mochi. I just skipped the step of adding the sweet sakura glaze for a lovely sweet and savory salad topper. Baked norimaki are served warm out of the oven and are chewy and slightly sweet, savory  and  a perfect blend of flavors that brings together all my memories of living in Japan.

Norimaki mochi is made from a special type of pounded rice called mochi. Mochi is made from a kind of rice called Mochigome. Have you ever seen blocks of white mochi sold in the Asian food stores? Mochigome is much stickier compared to the normal shortgrained rice in Japan. Mochigome is steamed and then pounded while it’s hot and this pounding increases viscosity and the soft glutinous mass becomes smooth and elastic and in factories they shape into blocks and let harden. In Japan there are festivals surrounding the event of the old fashion method of pounding the steamed mochigome with a mallet and hammer. Mochi can be enjoyed baked, grilled or fried but you cannot eat it raw or otherwise you would break your teeth as it is very hard. However, something very magical happens when the mochi blocks are baked, grilled or fried as they become hot, soft and chewy on the inside and on the outside the mochi block becomes slightly toasty and crispy. It is kind of hard to describe, but do you know what happens to a marshmallow when you toast it? Mochi is not as light as a marshmallow but it a happy culinary eating experience. I glaze my mochi blocks with a little soy and brown sugar glaze and when it gets soft and slightly golden remove from oven and wrap in a nori leaf and this dish is called norimaki mochi. Nori means seaweed. Maki means to roll and mochi is pounded rice. I hope you can try this dish sometime soon.

Matcha Soba Salad and Baked Norimaki_IMG_8255

You can make your salad with any vegetables you have in your crisper. The sky is the limit. I also topped my matcha soba salad with sakura toasted sesame seeds but you could also swap out with plain toasted white or black sesame seeds. There are many different kinds of soba noodles. There are plain soba, sakura flavoured soba or even cha (green tea/matcha) soba like I used. The salad is great all on its own and my boys loved it as a part of their bento boxed lunches for school. Matcha soba salad can be made 24 hours in advance and is a great dish to bring to functions you have going on this spring/summer.

Matcha Soba Salad and Baked Norimaki_IMG_8270

You can find the mochi blocks to make Norimaki in any Asian food market that carries Japanese products. I absolutely love norimaki but it is not essential to make this matcha soba salad. If you are diabetic, then just swap out the honey for a sugar alternative of your choice and swap out more the soba with more of the delicious crunchy vegetables and exchange to norimaki with cut thin slices of nori leaves (dried seaweed).

Matcha Soba Salad and Baked Norimaki_IMG_8293

Wishing everyone a super week!

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Matcha Soba Salad with Norimaki Mochi

By HWC Magazine  , , , , , , , ,   

April 25, 2014

Cold matcha (green tea) soba noodles tossed with fresh crunchy vegetables, a light and flavorful sesame dressing and topped off with a crisp and chewy norimaki is the perfect way to greet spring.

  • Cook: 30 mins
  • Yields: 3 Adults or 1 Hungry Teenager

Ingredients

soba noodles (100% buckwheat) - 66 grams (1 section of the noodles of a 200 gram package)

spinach - 1 cup chopped

Carrot - 1/4 cup julienne slices or use a grater

red bell pepper - 1/4 cup diced

yellow bell pepper - 1/4 cup diced

Sesame Dressing

sesame oil - 2 tablespoons or to taste

honey - 2 teaspoons or to taste

tamari (soy) sauce - 1/4 cup or to taste

daikon radish (white radish) - 1-2 tablespoon or to taste

tamarind - 1/4 cup or to taste (Soak tamarind paste in hot water)

sesame seeds - 2 teaspoons (garnish)

Norimaki

Kirimochi (切り餅) - 3 blocks

dried nori leaves - 3 leaves (2.5 inches x 7.5 inches or 6 cm x 16 cm)

tamari (soy) sauce - 1/4 cup

brown sugar - 2 tablespoons

Directions

1Boil the soba noodles according to the package instructions... Start out by boiling your water and then drop in the soba noodles. Then drop the temperature down from a boil to a simmer and cook for about 5-7 minutes or until aldente.  There is no need to salt the water. Drain the noodles in a strainer in the sink and let the cool water gentle run over your noodles for a minute or two, wash the soba noodles so they from any remaining starch residue and until the noodles are cool..drain well (Reserve some of the pasta water to drink,if you like, as it is full of vitamins and minerals or discard)

2In a large bowl add the cooked and cooled soba noodles, chopped spinach, chopped red and yellow bell peppers, carrots or really any vegetables you fancy and have in your crisper.

3Preheat oven to 190 Celsius or 375 F to make your norimaki.

4Make your Japanese sesame dressing for your Matcha soba salad: Add sesame oil, honey, tamari (soy) sauce, grated diakon and tamarind juice. Taste and adjust seasoning as desired. If you want it more salty add more tamari sauce, it you want it more spicy add more diakon radish, if you want it more sour add more tamarind. (You can also use lemon, rice vinegar, limes or yuzu instead of tamarind for the sparkle in the dressing.)

5Add your Japanese sesame dressing to the matcha soba salad and toss lightly. Divide your Matcha soba salad between 3 plates and garnish with sesame seeds.

6Make your norimaki. Make the tamari (soy sauce) glaze: add tamari (soy sauce) to a small pan and add brown sugar and cook over low medium heat until it is a nice and thick glaze about 5 minutes. Set aside.

7Place the Kirimochi (切り餅) blocks on a pre-greased baking sheet. Slather the tamari brown sugar glaze on each Kirimochi (切り餅) and bake for about 10 minutes or until firm on the outside and chewy on the inside. Don't cook too long or it will end up in a pool of mochi (completely melted). The goal is you want the edges to be crispy but the inside to be tender. If you do not have an oven, you can also pan fry or grill instead.

8Trim your nori (dried seaweed) into 3 long strips the same width as your mochi. (Alternatively you can buy the thin pre-cut strips of nori). Immediately wrap the warm mochi in nori. Place a delicious hot out of the oven norimaki on each plate of cool matcha soba salads.

9Enjoy. The matcha soba salad can be made up to 24 hours in advance. Just right before serving, make your normaki and garnish with sesame seeds. If you are diabetic, then just swap out the honey in the salad dressing for a sugar alternative of your choice and swap out more the soba with more of the delicious crunchy vegetables and exchange to norimaki with cut thin slices of nori leaves (dried seaweed).

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  • Joanna

    It’s so colorful and pretty! 🙂 I am thinking about taking my blog from wordpress to my own site… what are your thoughts on this?

    • Bams Kitchen

      Thanks Joanna! I think you need to ask yourself what can I get from having a self hosted site that I can’t have just by staying on wordpress. The reason why I moved to a self hosted site as I wanted some added functionality and plugins and I could not do that within the wordpress. WordPress is free, self hosting is not. WordPress is there to help you with your issues and sometimes hosting companies are not. We can take this discussion off line if you wish, just shoot me an e-mail. My other blogging buddies, feel free to chime in at any time.

  • I remember what the heat was like when we lived in Mauritius and all business men wore full suits, some with waist coats as well as vests under their shirts! It was madness. Pete never wore a tie only only ever put his jacket on when absolutely necessary!
    Your salad sounds heavenly.
    Have a wonderful weekend Bam.
    🙂 Mandy xo

    • Bams Kitchen

      Hello Mandy, I know it is crazy. This morning at only 0900 it was already too hot. Have a super weekend. BAM

  • Robyn

    This looks so delish, Bobbi, and I’ve never had norimaki before. You are always introducing me to new foods and I love the challenge. The radish in the dressing is such a nice touch and I am going to make that dressing to use on lots of salads – I absolutely LOVE the ingredients and my taste buds are tingling just thinking of it. I’m very close to gluten-free now as well and I’m convinced it’s the only way to go. This dish has everything – fabulous flavours, stunning colours and gorgeous presentation!
    Enjoy your weekend!

    • Bams Kitchen

      Thanks so much Robyn. Going gluten-free is really not that hard as everyone thinks, especially now there are all kinds of delicious alternatives. I would highly suggest to double the sesame dressing recipe and then your can just keep in the refrigerator and drizzle on your favorite salads. Take Care, BAM

  • What is nori maki actually made from, Bam? Is it another version of tofu. Love the salad.

    • Bams Kitchen

      Hello Dave, thanks for stopping by and great question.

      Norimaki mochi is made from Mochi, it is not a type of tofu but a special type of pounded rice called mochi. Mochi is made from a kind of rice called Mochigome. Have you ever seen blocks of white mochi sold in the Asian food stores? Mochigome is much stickier compared to the normal shortgrained rice in Japan. Mochigome is steamed and then pounded while it’s hot and this pounding increases viscosity and the soft glutinous mass becomes smooth and elastic and in factories they shape into blocks and let harden. In Japan there are festivals surrounding the event of the old fashion method of pounding the steamed mochigome with a mallet and hammer. Mochi can be enjoyed baked, grilled or fried but you cannot eat it raw or otherwise you would break your teeth as it is very hard. However, something very magical happens when the mochi blocks are baked, grilled or fried as they become hot, soft and chewy on the inside and on the outside the mochi block becomes slightly toasty and crispy. It is kind of hard to describe, but do you know what happens to a marshmallow when you toast it? Mochi is not as light as a marshmallow but it a happy culinary eating experience. I glaze my mochi blocks with a little soy and brown sugar glaze and when it gets soft and slightly golden remove from oven and wrap in a nori leaf and this dish is called norimaki mochi. Nori means seaweed. Maki means to bake or grill and mochi is pounded rice. I hope you can try this dish sometime soon.

  • This looks like a great spring salad. I especially love the sesame dressing – it’s one of my favorites.

    • Bams Kitchen

      Love your new gravatar picture Kristy! Thanks so much. Have a super weekend. BAM

  • I’ve just started eating soba noodles and love them! This looks so delicious! 🙂

    • Bams Kitchen

      Thanks Tina

  • That’s a fine looking salad my friend. I just have to tell you that in addition to being amazed by your unique creations, I love getting a glimpse of life in Hong Kong. I’m sure it can be challenging at times but what an experience to be so fully immersed in a culture so different from ours.

    • Bams Kitchen

      Hello Diane, thanks so much for your sweet comments. I think maybe some of the things I take for granted because I live here you guys might really enjoy. Maybe I need to find a way to incorporate my recipes and photos of Asia. It does have its challenges, at times, but we are going on 5 years living in Hong Kong so for us, it feels like home.

  • kitchenriffs

    Soba noodles really are so good. This looks like a terrific way to use them! Very refreshing. Thoroughly entertaining read — I always enjoy hearing about your experiences in lands I have yet to visit (or really, your experiences in places I know, too!). Fun post — thanks.

    • Bams Kitchen

      Hello John, I am glad I can give you a little glimpse of Asia. I think the world is a really small place, don’t you think? Knowing bloggers, like yourself, all over the world has made the world seem even smaller. I love learning about different cultures and food. Wishing you a super weekend! Take Care, BAM

  • Both your salad and Norimaki sound wonderful! I hadn’t heard of Norimaki before, but I think I would love it!

    • Bams Kitchen

      Thank you Nancy. I think you would really like norimaki mochi if you can find mochi blocks as your local Asian store, I hope you give it a try as it has that whole sweet-salty thing going on.

  • Looks very interesting, love the colors in the salad!

    • Bams Kitchen

      Thanks Dawn!

  • Such a beautiful salad. It’s still cool here, so it’s unusual to think about steamy hot weather. But I’d eat that salad any time of year!

    • Bams Kitchen

      Hello Beth, Thanks so much. I would love for it to be cool and comfortable here in HK but now I am afraid the heat and humidity will not let up until December again.

  • That plate is a delicious feast! Oh yeah I agree with you about the hot and humid weather there in Asia. Some of my friends here in the US complaining about the heat especially here in Southern California. I always tell them, try moving to Asia and you will see what you are complaining about. Have a wonderful weekend BAM! 🙂

    • Bams Kitchen

      Hello Ray! Thanks so much for your kind comment. It might be hot all over the world but it can never be as humid as it is here in Asia. The kind of heat that you just sweat standing there…I have 4 dehumidifiers going all the time and still cannot stay on top of it. I hope it is less humid in Sunny California. Have a super weekend. BAM

  • This looks absolutely delicious. A total meal, perfect for this time of year. I did not know that soba was buckwheat and from seeds, very interesting. Love buckwheat pancakes. Happy week-end to you!

    • Bams Kitchen

      Thanks Cheri for your lovely comment. I love buckwheat pancakes too they are so filling.

  • Summer will be here soon and this salad will be featured frequently.

    • Bams Kitchen

      Hello Norma, you first have to wait until your snow melts… Sending some warm thoughts your way. Take Care, BAM

  • This looks amazing, Bam. I love all of your photos, as well. 🙂

    • Bams Kitchen

      Thanks Shanna, you are so sweet. I have so much to learn in the area of photography and really want to take a class or something to give me a jump start. The other day my husband was at home and just watching me take all the photos, the lighting the props, etc and all the work that goes into food photography and he had no idea but was getting impatient as I kept on telling him just one last shot and all he wanted to do was eat. LOL Have a super weekend. BAM

  • Eha

    Beautiful salad – love soba noodles and use them at least a couple of times a week! Colourful, appetizing and healthy!! I guess this very modern gal must sound very old-fashioned when she admits I adore men in full suit and tie, including a vest – tailor-made, of course 🙂 ! All of ‘my’ guys always have, even in tropical countries 😀 !!

    • Bams Kitchen

      Hello Eha. Thank you for your sweet comment. Have you noticed there is a new trend in Asia and in the hotter areas for special suits that are not lined but super thin material and even has air vents. My husband had one made and he said it made a big difference to help keep him cool and comfortable.

  • This sounds like a perfect meal 🙂

    • Bams Kitchen

      Thanks Tandy!

  • Why do they need to set the aircond higher? To be Eco-friendly? I love soba noodles and I think I know have a craving!

    • Bams Kitchen

      Hello Kelly. In Japan they set the aircons higher after the disaster as energy conservation was integral as not to stress the infrastructure after the devastation. Now they do it to conserve. I hope you can enjoy a light and delicious matcha soba salad soon.

  • hotlyspiced

    My mother always told me, ‘Ugg boots are not to be worn outside the house’. And she never had to tell me not to wear them with shorts because that was a given. I love soba noodles and this dish is just gorgeous, Bam. What a lovely salad and there are just so many flavours. It’s really colourful and healthy and it’s something I’m sure I could have seconds and even thirds. A great Good Friday dish xx

    • Bams Kitchen

      Hi there Charlie, I don’t think either of our moms would need to tell us not to wear fur hats in the middle of summer. Uggg is right! Thanks so much for your sweet comment. Sometimes I need for my salads to have some sustenance and this one really hits the bill. I bet you are still on recovery after coordinating that exciting 21st B-day party. Have a super weekend. BAM

    • Lol! no one should ever wear ugg boots outside the house!!

  • OH MY GOD!!! How can they wear so much fur! I would be melting hot in all that!! Love all your pics, really puts us in the picture. The soba noodles look delicious too 🙂

    • Bams Kitchen

      Fur with shorts at that! I really need to start getting some more non food photos whilst living in Asia as there are some pretty unusual outfits that the teenagers wear today.

  • This has me seriously craving soba! I’m making some soon, even if it won’t be as delicious as yours. Stay cool!

    • Bams Kitchen

      Hello Monica! Happy Sunday to you! Soba is everywhere at the markets as it is the time of the year around Sakura season that makes it popular. It is another blazing hot day in HK.

  • Lovely as always BAM. Really lovely.
    Best,
    C

    • Bams Kitchen

      Thanks Conor

  • Oh this is such a great idea! I love cooking with matcha powder. I made a green tea cake with it once.

    • Bams Kitchen

      The matcha is actually incorporated directly unit the noodles. It gives you just a little kick to get you through the day, but I think importantly it just gives the slab a beautiful green colour. Take Care, BAM

  • Can’t wait to try this out!

    • Bams Kitchen

      Thanks and I am heading over to your site now to check out your explorations.

  • I haven’t dropped by here in a while and so awed to see this post! I love soba and this looks absolutely yummy, would love to try this! It is going into my to-do must-do must-try list! Have a great week ahead!

    • Bams Kitchen

      Thanks for dropping by and thanks so much for your kind comment. I am on my way over to your site. I have been having website issues and currently can’t access the backend of Bam’s Kitchen, so please excuse my delayed replies. This little salad works so perfectly in a bento lunch. I think your family would quite like it. Have a super day. BAM

  • shashi @ http://runninsrilankan.com

    Yum – this soba noodle salad sounds fantastic – I am so intrigued by the dressing with sesame oil, honey, tamari sauce, grated diakon and tamarind juice – sounds amazing!

    • Bams Kitchen

      Thanks so much. I think this dressing has a nice balance between sweet, sour, savoury and just a tad of heat from the diakon. I hope you give it a try and adjust your amounts of each of the 4 components to your liking. Have a super week. Take Care, BAM

  • Joanna

    Yeah, that’s the only thing I’m thinking about is the plug-ins and such…and the personalization aspect. But I checked it out and to go premium (which I’ll have to do for media space and to have my own site will be about the same price per year…BUT with my own site, I will have unlimited space, with WP 10 gigs is the max. Which is a lot, but still). Anywho…I’ve given you an award on my blog…Don’t worry, no need to reciprocate or do anything, just go check it out please! 🙂 Find it here: http://foodgurly.com/2014/04/28/low-glycemic-gluten-free-sugar-free-brownies-wbuttercream-frosting-and-an-award/

    • Bams Kitchen

      Thank you Joanna for thinking of me. There are so many hosting companies around the world, so you just have to find the right one for you. Remember backing up and all the things you don’t have to worry about as much now will be all your responsibility. Some hosting companies do a backup of all your things once a week, you need to ask about the details. Take care, BAM

  • Wow Bam,
    Looks and sounds incredible!!

  • Great salad – I love those matcha soba noodles! They are so pretty; I am going to keep a look-out for them at the grocery store.

    • Bams Kitchen

      Thanks Amy! Have a super week. BAM

  • Buona sera, BAM! What a great post! Your description of waiting for the bus in sweltering heat brought to mind my office career days, arriving to work already sweating heavily. Unlike the poor Japanese, however, we had a/c and it was running full tilt. My Italian market won’t allow photos, so I’ve been reminded a couple of times. The place had been recently featured on a national cooking show, so, you can imagine my surprise when I was told to put the camera away.
    Your salad looks very good and is substantial enough to make a fine meal. I have to do more with soba noodles,too. I’m not familiar with kirimochi nor with norimaki. I’m going to look for them both the next time I go to a Japanese restaurant. Thanks for the heads up!
    Have a great week!

    • Bams Kitchen

      Buona Sera John! Thanks so much for your kind comment.
      There is nothing like the feeling of sticking to your work clothes before you even get to work. The trick about photo taking is to use your phone and pretend like you are on a skype conference call. Works like a charm all the time, well at least in a crowded and noisy place. Norimaki mochi is a real treat and if you happen to ever visit and Asian market that has Japanese food products just as them for kirimochi which are the pre made blocks of pounded mochi. They usually come in a pack of 8-10 with each one individually wrapped. You can make those little baked normaki mochi treats in about 5 minutes. You most likely will not see baked norimaki mochi at a resturant as it usually something that a Japanese home cook would make as treats for her/his family. I am on my way over to give you a visit. Take care, BAM

  • I have to check at the local Asian s/m for the soba noodles! We all love this type of food and I think this meal would be perfect for my family!

    • Bams Kitchen

      Hi Katerina, soba noodles are such a great addition to your pantry. In a moments notice and with just a couple of ingredients, you can have a meal on your table in less than 30 minutes. Have a super week. BAM

  • What a beautiful and colorful salad. Your photos are always great but these are outstanding. Loved the fur hat and boots with the shorts, by the way…I guess she was just being fashionable. 😀

    • Bams Kitchen

      Awww, Karen you are making me blush. Thank you for your sweet comment. I guess I was just lucky with my picture taking on this day. The girl in the fur and shorts is just gorgeous. I bet everyone who read this post is going to add that outfit to their wardrobe this year. Especially my poor readers in Canada and Northern States. You never know when you are going to have late May, June or even July snowfall, so you need to be prepared either way…

  • This salad looks delicious, Bam! I had no idea soba noodles are wheat-free!

    • Bams Kitchen

      Thank you! Not all soba noodles are completely 100% wheat free as it depends on the manufacturer. If your soba is made out of 100% buckwheat then you are good to go. If they have additives or are not 100% buckwheat, then you have to read the label to make sure, especially if your are gluten intolerant. Take care, BAM

  • I know how delicious this soba salad is, Bam! Look amazing! I love how you add lots of colors to this dish. And mochi? YEEEESSS! I wouldn’t think of adding mochi, and you just did it beautifully. Now my appetite is 200% thanks to the addition of my favorite food… I can eat 4 mochi on top of salad. 😀

    • Bams Kitchen

      Nami-san, arigato gozarimasu. Thank you very much for your sweet comment and coming from the Queen of Japan cuisine, it means so very much to me. I too, just love norimaki mochi. I could easily eat 4 in one sitting easily. Wishing you a super week! Take care, BAM

  • Wow look at that beautiful dish! And yes talking about fashion, I grew up in different places in Asia and the one on your photo still looks normal 🙂

  • Bam you have filled not only your body and your soul… with this recipe, with these photo you make me travel again in Japan… you have a great (and multi-staking) talent!

  • Maureen | Orgasmic Chef

    I’m going to wait for the hottest day of the year and go out in boots and a fur hat. 🙂 Just for fun.

    I love that you looked at what was in your pantry and came up with a dish that looks as beautiful as this. I loved the photos too!

  • Fabulous noodle salad! Perfect for a hot and humid night’s dinner. If I could find Norimaki, I’d love to give it a try. I have a feeling Bill might not be so adventurous, but it IS rice…so maybe he’d give it a go 🙂 Or I’d just eat his portion!

  • Looking good there my friend! I’ve never come across mochi – but I will look out for on my next trip to an asian store, my interest is piqued! The salad, whatever the weather would work for me, and I ‘m going to try the dressing as it sounds delicious
    and that photo of the fur hatted and booted girl with the shorts made me smile, she looks like she’s off to a music festival!

  • Now this brilliant, healthy dish sounds like it was made with me specifically in mind! I love green tea soba, and rarely get a chance to enjoy the savory side of mochi. I miss Japan so dearly, but mochi always reminds me of my first day with my home stay family, back in high school. I was still bleary from the plane ride over and we were eating okonomiyaki, and I thought the pale squares in the pancakes were cheese (I wasn’t yet vegan) but when I took a bite, they stretched on and on forever! That was my first bite of mochi, little did I know. Anyhow, thanks for bringing all of those wonderful memories back with an equally delicious recipe. 🙂

  • Great pictures!!

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  • Thos is incredible.. green macha and thiis cpmbo os awesome. Inspired me to gove this a try. Colors have captivatwd me

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